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Navi Singh

Infomagical Challenge

Happy Tuesday Criosadairs!

When was the last time you felt caught up? Ever feel like you cannot handle all the information pouring out from all the screens? However, you keep reading and watching anyway?


On my drive home, yesterday while listening to NPR's all tech considered segment, Manoush Zomorodi, from  WNYC's Note to Self podcast, talked about the effects of Infomania, which is defined by the Oxford dictionary as “the compulsive desire to check or accumulate news and information, typically via mobile phone or computer.”

 

WNYC's Note to Self podcast decided to see if it is even possible to get a grip on the phenomenon of information overload. Working with neuroscientists, behavioral engineers, and social psychologists they developed a weeklong, interactive project called "Infomagical."

 

The  key highlights of what they found are:

  1. Information overload is real.
  2. The concept of "information overload" itself isn't new, but the scope is.
  3. Information overload makes us stressed out, but we don't stop.
  4. Overload makes us worse at processing information.
  5. The implications are just starting to settle in on a mass cultural level.
  6. But! There are things we can do in the meantime.

 

Scientists say there are a few basic principles that may help us readjust our information intake to sustainable levels: We have to set information goals; we have to write them down, and we have to be reminded of those goals — or "probed" — at opportune moments throughout our day.

 

WNYC Has created a week of experiments neuroscientists approved, that fits into our everyday life to synthesize what's known about information overload.

Below is a link to sign up for the challenges to try out with you mobile phone.

http://project.wnyc.org/infomagical/