Time Flies [Seven Keys Part I] | Ratchet Belt without Holes Adjustable Belt Survival Belt | SlideBelts

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Jordan Lee

Time Flies [Seven Keys Part I]

Happy Thursday!

 

This month's theme will be our Seven Keys. I'll be going over them in our mnemonic order (GESSOGC), so the first one'll be "Get Your Shift Together."  

 

Pretty much everyone knows at least one person that is perpetually late for everything. What's your opinion of this kind of person? Do you feel like you could rely on them? Probably not. How can you depend on someone if you can't even be sure they'll show up? If you look up "best practices for job interviews," I absolutely guarantee that "show up 10-15 minutes early" will be in >90% of the articles. There are essentially two reasons that a person is consistently tardy: being flaky/forgetful or being disrespectful of others' time. Neither of these things is a particularly desirable trait for an employee.

 

Let me say this again, because I believe it very strongly. Being consistently late is a sign of disrespect. This might seem a little harsh, and I do concede that few chronically late people are actively saying, "Show up on time? Ha! To the Devil with that person. They can wait!" But if you care enough about something, you will find the time to promptly show up for it. Allowing an appointment to fall by the wayside again and again means that it's not high on your list of priorities. No one likes to be considered low-priority.

 

Everyone has many demands on their time, so being punctual demonstrates that you're respecting the other person's schedule. It says to them, "I consider our appointment to be more important than anything else I could be doing right now." In the workplace, this means that you're showing your employer and coworkers that you take your job seriously. In social situations, it means that you're showing consideration for the relationships with your friends/significant other. It's really this simple: the most important first step in any interaction is to be present