8am Start time | Ratchet Belt without Holes Adjustable Belt Survival Belt | SlideBelts

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Rick Lilley

8am Start time

 Happy Thursday team!

One of the things that we try to emphasize here is work life balance. It is the motivation behind the 35 hour work week and the open vacation policy. We want everyone to be able to enjoy their time off, the other side of that is that we all have to make the most of those 35 hours. The first step to doing that is to be on time and ready to go at 8am. I found a couple of articles with some great tips to help everyone out. I think the first step to being on time is to really evaluate why you are late.

  1. Reevaluate how long your routines really take.  Late people tend to remember the one time they got ready in 20 minutes or the one time they got to work in seven, instead of realizing that most days it takes them 40 minutes or 15. DeLonzor (Author of “Never be late again”) recommends writing down your daily habits and then estimating how long you think it takes you to do each one — then spend a week or so writing down how long each thing actually takes. “Late people tend to engage in magical thinking,” she says. It’s time to relearn how to tell time.

  2. Change your thoughts, not just your behavior. Re-framing the way you think about punctuality can be an effective cognitive trick. Instead of stressing about it, sit down with a pen and paper (when you’re not in a rush) and jot down all the positives that come with being on time. You might write, for example, that being timely will make you look more responsible, or that it will stir up less conflict with co-workers. Think about the things that are going to motivate you to be on time, and remember them the next time you’re trying to cram in too much before a deadline.

  3. Get down with downtime. Eternally tardy people, often like to pack in as many activities as possible to maximize productivity, which can make any extra waiting time uncomfortable. Another option is to reframe downtime as something to enjoy between all the rushing — luxury time instead of wasted time. “A big part of the enjoyment of life is just sitting back and talking to the person next to you or looking at the sky or smelling roses,” DeLonzor says.

  4. Budget your time differently. Timely people will give themselves round numbers to get somewhere — 30 minutes, for instance. The chronically late, on the other hand, often budget exact times, like 23 minutes, to get somewhere, a habit that DeLonzor calls “split second timing,” which doesn’t account for the inevitable delay factors that pop up. “If you’re exactly on time, that means you engaged in split second timing,” she says. “You should not consider yourself on time unless you’re 15 minutes early.”

  5. Reschedule your day. Habits tend to be reflexive patterns of behavior and what we need to do is change that pattern. Start writing appointments down 30 minutes before they actually happen, which will help you start planning before the last second. And reevaluate your to-do list — chances are, you’re simply not going to get everything done. One suggestion is to split things into categories: what you absolutely must do, and what has a negotiable timeline. Try crossing a few of the latter off the list, or move them to a time when you’re less harried. And be sure to schedule in downtime every day so you know when it’s time to relax, and when it’s time to get moving.

On a side note, we should have order fulfillment caught up today! Great job everyone for pitching in and getting us caught up.

As some of you probably know, we have some new crusaders!  Be sure to welcome Kelly back and introduce yourself to Gabby.  WELCOME TO THE TEAM!

Have a great rest of your week!